Rudy Giuliani Hit With $148 Million Verdict in Defamation Case by Georgia Election Workers

A federal jury has mandated former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani to pay $148 million to two former Georgia election workers, Ruby Freeman and Wandrea ArShaye “Shaye” Moss. 

The jury found Giuliani liable for spreading false claims of voter fraud after the 2020 presidential election. 

Freeman and Moss, who faced severe repercussions, sought a combined $48.6 million in compensatory damages, but the jury’s award surpassed expectations, reaching $148 million.

The civil trial spanned four days, with emotional testimony from Freeman and Moss detailing the distress caused by baseless accusations. 

Giuliani, who served as Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, continued to assert his unfounded claims even after the verdict. 

He vowed to appeal the ruling, dismissing the awarded amount as absurd.

Giuliani’s defamation targeted Freeman and Moss, falsely accusing them of engaging in a fake ballot processing scheme. 

The fallout from these allegations led to racist threats, damaging Freeman’s business, and forcing her to sell her house.

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Giuliani Verdict Damages and Fallout Questions

rudy-giuliani-hit-$148-million-verdict-defamation-case-georgia-election-workers
A federal jury has mandated former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani to pay $148 million to two former Georgia election workers, Ruby Freeman and Wandrea ArShaye “Shaye” Moss.

Moss faced professional setbacks, missing out on promotions and job opportunities.

The jury awarded compensatory damages for defamation and emotional distress, totaling $16,171,000 for Freeman and $16,998,000 for Moss. 

An additional $75 million in punitive damages was assigned for both plaintiffs. 

Despite Giuliani’s defiance, the verdict signals a significant legal blow and raises questions about the repercussions of spreading false information.

Giuliani’s net worth, currently lower than the awarded amount, has been a subject of discussion. His attorney argued that the sum would be a “civil equivalent of the death penalty” for his client. 

The former mayor’s refusal to testify and continued false claims during the trial likely influenced the jury’s decision.

The case shows the wider problem of disinformation and its practical repercussions. 

Freeman and Moss, two innocent election workers, fell prey to a calculated campaign of misinformation. 

The verdict, while offering them some vindication, prompts reflection on the challenges of addressing the aftermath of false narratives in the era of fast-spreading misinformation.

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