California School Guard Linked to Homemade Bomb Trade with Teen Accomplice

California security guard Angelo Jackson Mendiver admitted on Monday to running a homemade explosives business in collaboration with a teenager he was entrusted to protect.

In a recent announcement by the US Attorney’s Office, it was revealed that Angelo Jackson Mendiver, aged 27, has pleaded guilty to a range of charges. 

These charges include conspiring to engage in manufacturing and dealing in explosive materials, mailing explosive devices, and making false statements to FBI agents.

The arrest of Mendiver occurred in June when investigators seized approximately 500 pounds of explosives and explosive materials from his Bakersfield residence.

Another 500 pounds were found at the home of his teenage business associate

The illicit activities were coordinated through an Instagram account featuring images and videos of the hazardous materials.

Court documents revealed that Mendiver and the teen communicated through the social media platform, sharing photos and videos of homemade explosive devices.

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California Guard’s School Explosives Business Uncovered

california-school-guard-linked-homemade-bomb-trade-teen-accomplice
California security guard Angelo Jackson Mendiver admitted on Monday to running a homemade explosives business in collaboration with a teenager he was entrusted to protect.

In one message, Mendiver sent an image of a titanium salute, an explosive device, accompanied by two videos showcasing homemade explosives, emphasizing their lethal capabilities.

Operating nationally, the duo had clients across the country who purchased the explosives and materials. Transactions were facilitated through mail deliveries orchestrated by Mendiver and the teen.

What makes this revelation more alarming is that Mendiver conducted his illicit activities while employed as a campus security supervisor at Arvin High School, located just outside Bakersfield. 

The Kern School District, overseeing the high school with 2,500 students, has not responded to requests for comment.

Mendiver may face a maximum prison sentence of five years and be subject to fines of up to $1 million for the four charges brought against him. 

The case has brought attention to the possible hazards that exist in unexpected locations and prompts questions regarding the security protocols implemented in educational establishments.

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